Weekend reading: term vs whole life, retirement planning, and more

Share this post

Hi and welcome to weekend reading, where we share some of the best posts we read over the past week. We hope you enjoy them as much as we did. If you haven’t already, please consider following us on TwitterFacebook, and Google+, where we share the latest in personal finance, debt, retirement, insurance, tax and investments.

Insurance

Here at AAFS Insurance, we looked at disability insurance riders that you should add to your disability insurance policy. Riders are optional add-ons that improve your policy, and the ones highlighted in the post are essential to a strong policy.

The Canada Life Insurance blog compares whole life to term life insurance. Term insurance is mostly used for protection only, while whole life insurance usually has an investment component to it as well.

Empire Life’s Insuring With Care blog says that summer is not the time to forget about purchasing life insurance, since more fatalities occur on Canadian roads during the summer months than any other time of the year.

Perhaps it’s a controversial topic, but since wealthy individuals have a lower mortality rate than people who live in poor areas, Life Insurance Canada asks if life insurance should be lower for the wealthy?

Personal Finance

Barry at Money We Have discusses whether you should use cash or credit for your purchases. Both have their benefits and drawbacks, but if you’re worried about fraud, then using cash is the best way to protect yourself.

If you’re planning for retirement, Kevin at Brighter life says to expect the unexpected, since 69% of Canadians had their retirements impacted by one or more factors. The biggest reason retirement doesn’t go according to plan is because of health concerns, which are usually unexpected.

Investments

Jim at Retire Happy talks about the biggest mistakes investors make. Some of them are chasing past performance and market timing, two things that are proven not to work with historical data.

A report commissioned by Canadian regulators concludes that mutual fund fees hurt investment returns and that the commission structure for advisors should be overhauled.

We hope you enjoy the reads this weekend and be sure to check back next week for a new post. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter on the right side of the page so you don’t miss a single post.